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Table 1 Participant characteristics, n = 424

From: How is neighborhood social disorganization associated with diabetes outcomes? A multilevel investigation of glycemic control and self-reported use of acute or emergency health care services

Characteristic N (%) or mean (SD)
Age, mean (SD) 60.5 (11.5)
Sex
 Female 224 (52.8)
 Male 200 (47.2)
Educational level
 Some HS 24 (5.7)
 HS grad or GED 101 (23.9)
 Some college 154 (36.3)
 College degree 88 (20.8)
 Grad degree 57 (13.4)
Race
 White 271 (63.9)
 Black 138 (32.6)
 Other 15 (3.5)
Latino
 No 417 (98.4)
 Yes 7 (1.7)
Duration of diabetes, mean (SD) 8.2 (7.6)
Diabetes empowerment, mean (SD) 4.3 (0.5)
Diabetes self-care, mean (SD) 3.4 (1.4)
Diabetes distress, mean (SD) 10.5 (12.8)
Comorbidities, mean (SD) 3.4 (1.9)
Self-reported use of acute or emergency health care services, mean (SD) 1.2 (2.3)
A1c, mean (SD) 7.5 (1.1)
Neighborhood economic disadvantagea
 Low 52 (12.3)
 Medium 314 (74.1)
 High 58 (13.7)
Neighborhood residential instabilitya
 Low 61 (14.4)
 Medium 288 (67.9)
 High 75 (17.7)
Neighborhood ethnic heterogeneitya
 Low 79 (18.6)
 Medium 265 (62.5)
 High 80 (18.9)
NSDa
 Low 71 (16.8)
 Medium 300 (70.8)
 High 53 (12.5)
  1. NSD refers to neighborhood social disorganization
  2. a For all of the neighborhood variables, low was defined as one standard deviation below the mean, and high was defined as one standard deviation above the mean